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20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)
. to develop understandings of the impact of nightlife activity and maintaining safe environments. to facilitate the implementation of effective based approaches and nightlife approaches. to have knowledge how these can be managed effectively and network and working on an international and national level so we have a number of different themes. there is certainly an alcohol on alcohol and tobacco and other drugs and how they impact the viernlt. and health and safety standards, emerging trends in club culture, international nightlife tourism, policy and policing and public safety and nightlife associated with nightlife venues, sexual health and preventing violence in these settings and these are a number of themes the commission deals with on a regular basis and as a franciscan i think san francisco has a fair amount to say how we manage it and bodies like the entertainment commission are ways to engage the nightlife and entertainment communities in productive ways and improve public health and public safety, so you have the fliers that has the dates. it's at the mark hopkins ho
time, the effectiveness of creating an environment that allow us to reduce operational risk. so just not a cost cutting exercise. of course in our industry which is a high people intensive industry, the majority of the cuts comes on people. >> nthey're cutting around 15% f the total workforce and areas most affected will be fixed income primarily in london an new york. if we look past the restructuring announcement, if we look at the underlying business performance in the third quarter respect that was actually better than many anticipated. investment banking pretax profit beat by the largest margin by 48%. investment revenues did see a strong rise. wealth management franchise which really is what they want to focus on, net new money came in stronger than forecast at 7.7 billion swiss francs. kelly. >> carolyn, thanks very much. >> and what's extraordinary is the ubc has been tweeting this morning this is a extra strategic acceleration from a position of strength. if you're in the fixed income unit, you've been strategically accelerat accelerated -- >> out the door. one way to descri
. it is people like me are getting resumes every day in this difficult economic environment. from high class standing people. 800 sats, they are looking for jobs. what you have to do is find a hook on your resume and show a high sense of community service. when i interview people, basically, the desire and commitment to be the best, a strong work ethic. here i am introducing a legend. you know, the legends do something different. you know, these are some of the characteristics. you can get help from the university. if numbers don't speak to you, in other words, ben graham wrote a book called the intelligent investor in 1954. in the bookie prophesies that analysts evaluate management twice in the process. once through the numbers. when you look at a company, the company is growing and the return investment is widespread and profit margins and whatever -- the return to capital and whatever -- those are resulting from the efforts imagine. so you want to look at the financials. also, you want to look at the face-to-face and understand the business properly. if you don't like working with numbers
environment still? > > i don't believe so. long- term bonds, most of the gains that we have seen in there have been capital gains. we have to understand that when interest rates fall - and we're talking long-term interest rates - fall, long-term bonds will rise in value. but the opposite will also occur. so we're in an environment where long-term interest rates are, if they're not at record lows as we speak, they're pretty close to record lows, and you have central banks around the world - in the u.s. as well as other places - trying to reflate, trying to cause growth to happen. and when growth arises, interest rates rise. so you're betting against some of the most powerful central banks in the world by buying long-term bonds. > > what are you recommending to clients? > > if the client wishes to stay with bonds, then you move to the shorter end, that is the one-to-five-year area. they still could be affected to some degree if interest rates rise. and again, this would be long- term interest rates rising. but they certainly wouldn't be hurt as much as long-term bonds. there was a study i saw re
way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. -- the reliance on foreign fuel. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. i think, let's use this area as an example that we can hold up around the rest
extensively. some has warned it has gotten too big. they say it is damaging the environment and ruining people's health. >> from the center, you cannot see what is happening in alps. people have been quarrying marble here since ancient times. even today, a bathtub or garden walk away made of this marble is considered the height of luxury. the region is dependent on marble. excavating equipment has been used and it has changed the surrounding durant -- surrounding landscape entirely. what was once an individual craft has turned into a mechanized industry. environmental activists are fighting against the destruction of the home region. >> to save the alps, the quarrries should be closed if they are at 1,400 meters or higher. >> a century ago, 120,000 tons of marble were quarried here annually. today, it is 5 million tons a year. only a quarter of this is raw material for stonecutters or studios like this one in carrera. the whole new industry is being served. today, 3/4 of the marble is ground to dust. these facilities, most belonging to multinational corporations, would not allow us to film ins
this kind of seemingly open economy into vick victims -- victims, creating an environment where it's difficult to move up and young lebanese men and women leave the country to find jobs elsewhere whether it's in the gulf, europe, or the united states, and you see them in various places although the country's pretty small soçv' lebanese, the lebanese economy actually provided syria with a gate to the world in the 1980s, and that gate was a two-way gate so you will get the products that were not actually sold in the syria market officially through lebanon in the 1980s and provide goods to scrux later of the population, and the upper lay eric and then in the 1990s when the trades were more open, lebanon continued to be one of the ways that -- through which this took place, but in the 80s, lebanon and turkey were the two places where the illegal trades and smuggling allowed the black market to thrive and created a process of accumulation that literally created new stratas, now groups that created an interest in the stability of the regime. hence, when we talk about the syria regime, a
given the operating environment. they have worked on reducing the switchbacks and keeping the public informed and would further denigate service and safety. the jury answers, "that's what we're getting at that muni think it is switch backs are a normal way of business". other transportation systems were aghast, appalled that a transit system could inconvenience their customers so cavalierly and we want them to have the feeling that we are doing a good job" when they deem them unavoidable. recommendation two, contact and learn from paris not resorting to switchbacks regularly. muni agrees there is room for improvement and they will reach out to their peers to study their standard operating procedures but note the claim that others are using procedures similar to muni. the jury answers "the jury approves part of the response about contacting peers. we hope that you contact those systems that were on our list. these systems are seen by the controller as being similar to muni, and have higher reliability and passenger ratings than muni. if muni is going to strife for improvement
per day. bees live in highly organized societies that adapt rapidly to their environment, but they are under increasing threat from humans. this film director spent five years researching why bees were dying out. his film aims to wake people up to the problem. >> over the last six years, 30% of the population has died every year in europe, north america, and china. in parts of switzerland, the number is 70%. sometimes in america, it is between 50% and 70%, but on average, 30% every year. if it keeps going on like that, our valleys will soon look pretty sad. >> they're dying because of mites, bacteria, and parasites, a result of large-scale beekeeping. >> >> it is like wit -- >> it is like we are capitalists. we want to grow. total global domination. >> miller looks after 15,000 hives. he moves them between plantations of apple and -- allman and apple blossom, transporting them all across the u.s. -- plantations of almond and apple blossom. >> in reality, agriculture has to work in partnership with the bees, but when i approached agriculture department's in switzerland, th
with the high frequency trading environment. we're in an entirely different situation now in the last five years. even the locations. one of the very interesting parts of that is very mysterious about how could you have work if you had disruptions. >> tom: colocation is when a broker or trader puts their computer next to the exchange computer sometimes at the exchange. >> and finally, david, are you confident that the exchanges are ready to go tomorrow? >> i think they will be. if they say they are. this is a market situation. the exchanges know what's going on. they say they're ready. i'm confident they will be there. >> tom: you've been in that seat before. david ruder with us from the cme group, former chairman of the securities and exchange commission. >> tom: lincoln ellis is the chief investment officer with the strategic financial group. with us from chicago. do you think a cautious day of trading or a wild day of volatility? >> well, probably a bit of both. as you know, it's the month's end, and you have a fair amount of portfolio rebalancing that will happen tomorrow. that combineed wit
themselves quite well in the debates. but the point is, they're in this larger environment, what is going to go on. i worry we're going to see muddling through instead of clear-cut tax reform, infrastructure program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's --
from financials. how much worse will it get? >> it's also the regulatory environment. the barclays particularly in this country, a whole focus on bank management pay and so on. so clearly they're trying to respond to that regulatory and social push for lower pay to bank management. so with all of this in mind, if they can control costs, they can refocus business on either higher margin business or better quality business, at some point will be profitable. >> it broaden out to the market in general, you point out that, yes, earnings have been relatively in line with the paths. beating estimates like two-third of the time, but falling short on the revenue side. it doesn't necessarily point to a stronger market longer term. >> to me the early season in the u.s. has been poor. share negative for the first time in three years year on year. and revenue growth will be one of the key metrics to look at in the current environment. if nominal terms these countries cannot generate growth, what ask z. it mean for the global economy. >> 63% of cash flow is going to buy backs. what were the sect
, and big premier names started in absolutely awful economic environments. i mean, microsoft in the mid-70s, and same is said of dell, of apple, and yet they grew and thrived to be the giants they are of varying degrees today. >> yep. neil: what do you think is going on under the surface that guys like me in the media miss that as we are pooing the general economy d technology, what are we missing? >> well, you know, my many decades of working with proctor and gamble prior to microsoft give me a clear answer to what you t on the table, namely, if you put a product in front of someone that's truly excited clear benefits, easy to use, they know how to use it, let me tell you, you do create excitement. that's what t free enterprise systems about here in america, and the best products win, and right now, we got some exciting ones on that table. neil: so guys like you and roar, you know, visionaries, and i would throw you certainly in that camp. you don't necessarily overly focus on things ike a fiscal cliff or europe going to hell in a handbasket. you're aware of that, but if you're aware of t
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
an understanding of an environment -- if you come back to - 0, about focusing on the customer and producing products that our customers really want and value, it is an understanding in a sense of the economics, distribution, vehicles, the supply base. i talk about the 12,000 jobs at ford, the jobs in the supply base and related engineering activities. i really just keep coming back to the market itself, the opportunity to put great vehicles out there, to focus on the things people really want, and to talk back to the high- tech jobs. historically, our industry, particularly the domestic manufacturers in the detroit area -- for now, competitors of rust belt. we made a commitment to engineer the highest quality vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in every sector the we compete in every market around the world. if you come back to some of the investments i mentioned earlier, a very large percentage of those investments have been in very high-technology power trends, weather they are hybrid vehicles, battery, electronic vehicles. we now have six electrified the nichols we will be selling
environment and let's see if we can move outside the building space into the district space so to speak. are these competing visions or they complementary and can we imagine with all this doubling up of tech expertise here that we can begin to move some of the coproduce solutions quicker? >> echo production in this case is possible when and if something's happened. so dte in the city and key institutions like worsening in the university have to get together and say we want transparent the run energy consumption are building. was it going to take to have a dashboard that you and i can access on your smartphone or kids can access in their schoolrooms are parents and home double tell them which of the schools of the city school district are cleaner and greener and smarter than others. something that would require collaboration, that would have been utility to share the data. a lot of cities are now doing this to really change the game because now i have access to knowledge that will then tell me which school is least efficient and i'm going to focus on why that's inefficient. is it not whe
capital needs, economic needs and needs for support in its environment, its region for a very long time. that has been the point of some of the things that are not to do with nato and not to do with me that have been going on over this year. so there has been an istanbul process in which regional countries got together, it was followed up be a kabul conference this summer, a series of regional confidence-building measures. those are now going with support from the international community. foreign secretary, for instance, was in kabul in the summer for the second of those conferences and promised support to that process where we can. there is the international aid picture, 4.1 billion promised to the ansf or pledged to the ansf up to 2017. there is also a further 16 billion, roughly the same amount per year, on civil development aid up til then. so there are a lot of other actors. i'm not going to speak on their behalf. it's not my job, and i could mislead you, but what i will say is that what is done by isaf and what is done by our armed forces are a smaller part of that longer-term pic
people like me are getting resumÉs in every day in this difficult economic environment fromfy -- from phi betas, and they're looking for a job. what you've got to do is find a hook on your resumÉ, and to the extent that you show a high sense of community involvement on top of good grades, that may be a way of distinguishing yourself from the rest. now, also, you want to go into a field that you have an aptitude for. as i said, you're not going to you can seed at something -- succeed at something unless you have an aptitude. so i thought i'd put together a list of things i look for when i interview people. basically, a desire and commitment to be the best, a strong work ethic. here i am, the introducer says legend, and i keep saying a legend does not have an alarm clock that goes off at 5:50 in the morning to drive to jerseyty to be in his office at 6:45 every morning and go out every night of the week and try to figure out ways of beating the market. you know, that's, legends do something different. but, you know, these are some of the characteristics i look for. this, by the way, slide
. >> let's talk about how you got to 98.6 in an environment where everyone is still worried about retail. that means you're still signing people up. are these companies that formerly decided they didn't embrace the outlet and now are, or is this just more of the same, more under armor? more of a higher end guidance, more j. crew? >> people love the outlet. people love the bargain. they demand bargains in today's environment. everybody that manufactures almost anything today has an outlet distribution channel as part of their corporate strategy long-term. you mention under armor, they're great partners. but they've only been in business less than ten years. they've been public seven years. part of our skill set is identifying tenants of the future. which we want. we don't want tenants of the past. >> the ones that have been obsoleted by amazon do not have -- they just never went outlet. >> they did not. our products are basically apparel and footwear, sizes, colors. we do not sell computer hardware, books, things that are easily bought on the internet where you can get the best price on a
are they going to get it done in such a partisan environment. they saw a hellish recession. they've lived through that. they saw barack obama come into office with this great hope, and sort of this sweeping mandate of change. they saw it get bogged down in politics and they're not entirely sure another four years with obama is going to fix it, but they're equally unsure four years of changing track with mitt romney is going to change it. so you have people, like me, like you, like just about everybody, caught in the middle. what is the right way to go. >> all right. miguel in denver, we'll continue to watch your travels. really great work this week, miguel. and also, ali velshi, in a few hours, we'll up up on "your money." nice to see you, ali. >>> up next, china, a dominant topic at this week's presidential debate. we'll tell you whether china is more threat or opportunity. but first, there are more than 1.3 billion people in china. that makes up what percentage of the world's population? is it a, 9%, b, 19%, c, 29%, no googling. i'm going to tell you on the other side of the break. begin. tomat
, but i'm now of the opinion that really we'll see a very, very quiet environment from now really through the election. not just into the jobs number, but through the election. because i think there's just too much event risk out there for people to take any meaningful positions. >> great point. we'll leave it there. >>> still to come, new york slowly coming back to life after sandy brought most of the state to a standstill. >> scott cohn will have the latest on the ground. >>> apple you can see here during the month of october down nearly 11%. biggest monthly drop since november 2008. also just to remind you earlier we saw sony coming out with it numbers. market cap down to $11 billion. apple's market cap still way up, well over $500 billion. but not the best month for the world's biggest company. >> and a reminder these are your headlines. all three indexes snap a four month winning streak in october. u.s. election cam beening resumes as the northeast assesses the damage from super storm sandy. and shell sees profit drop by 15% on lower crude prices. earnings also expected to drop for e
discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went in an interview bin laden, the last western journalist the trekked into the mountains in afghanistan, and we did a prime-time special or two, but i had some dealings with the military in washington he said their biggest concern was an act of domestic terrorism. we had active discussions about doing more. in retrospect wish
-of-the-art monitoring technologies, are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. back. martha: hurricane sandy now picking up speed as it comes closer to land. the radar showing the megastorm's immense size and its potential to affect some 50 million people. it is coming over some of the most highly populated area in the country. let's bring in rick nab, head of the national hurricane center. good to have you with us. >> good morning. martha: as you've been reporting it is gaining strength at this point. it is it doing anything you did not predict this time yesterday? >> generally speaking, no. we've been forecasting a category 1 hurricane to remain offshore and make this left-hand turn which it has been doing overnight and this morning. it is now getting to an area where waters will be colder, but gets the shot of energy to keep its intensity up. defight -- despite the fact it is making into a poestd tropical system it is not changing impacts and a large system. we'll have several life-threatening hazards and storm surge and heavy rains and flooding and high
case of what actually happened there, but i think in this highly partisan environment right now no one believes what anybody says right now on either side. right now if you're a republican you believe what republican sources say, if you're a democrat you believe what democratic sources say. and i think that after the election we should have a full accounting of what actually happened there and people who made mistakes should be fired or held accountable as such. but between now and tuesday is not the time to have that debate. between now and tuesday we have to focus on our national election, and again, like i said, nobody believes what anybody is saying any more. it's unfortunate but that's what our politics have come to in this country where we just don't trust each other any more. megyn: chris plant is this very well rant to the national election. >> of course it is. we need answers and deserve answers before the election. the president needs to come out and make it clear whether he was the one making the calls during the massacre in benghazi, whether he was the one that personally i
to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] try new alka-seltzer plus severe allergy to treat allergy symptoms, plus sinus congestion, and pain. home of the legendary grand prix circuit. the p
out of in the field with detecting drugs is more difficult than in a turning environment. we do not advocate any particular role. what weight to give to each of them, i think that is a decision to be made by each court. what is really important is to say, it is not enough to just say a dog is trained. there has to be something more. >> for example, on record, very often the police testified -- if you looked at the cases off the field, the only record is when the dog alerted and they found something. in the best of circumstances -- that is what with all the respect what i am saying is not extreme. it is basic for the protection of our fourth amendment rights. >> if you are a trial judge, you only see the cases where the person comes into court because they found marijuana in the truck. if you are a 12 judge, maybe a dog got lucky this time. the only see the cases where something is found. i think a high score have to say, be skeptical. everything is before you made it is the stigma of a dealer, but you as the judge needs to view that it skeptically and tell the dog hammer and the
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> sandy hit new jersey hard. new jersey was in the center of the storm, no matter how you look at it, and barrier island of seaside heights were overrun during the surge. our next guest witnessed it first hand. he was one of the last to evacuate. toms river, he joins us now. and it's flooded there. keith, tell me how evacuations are doing? >> they seem to be going pretty well. the problem, the main highway that brings you over the bridge to seaside heights is flooded. there are boats in the middle of the bridge, so very difficult to get over there. >> a bridge i go over many times. let me ask you your sense now. everything joef run with water? anything survived? houses along the beach are completely gone, ripped off the foundation. what about beyond that? >> right now, some houses completely destroyed down into the water, when i was over there, i was over with the chief of police from seaside heights, tommy boyd, until 4:00 p.m. yesterday, watching the hurricane come in, taking out fronttown
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. the wheels of progress. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >>> our second story outfront, sandy devastates staten island. that borough has seen some of the worst damage in new york. six people killed there. two residents died in the cottonville section when two homes completely ripped from their foundations. shelters and hospitals lost power at the height of the storm. michael grim, part of his district in staten island. on the phone from the brooklyn part of that district tonight. good to talk to you, congressman, certainly not under these circumstances, though. obviously, i know have you been on the ground much of the day visiting your district, talking to residents. how are things
into candles. and again, i'm just trying do my part to make it a healthier environment for my son but if you have wood-burning fireplaces, there's a new law you need to know about or you can end up in smoke school. in 2008, the bay area air quality district launched its first winter "spare the air" program. staff meteorologists were diligently compiling information to determine if an alert should be issued. today is not a winter "spare the air" day here throughout the tri-valley and it's pretty obvious. the sky is blue and the clouds are big and puffy. but if it was a winter "spare the air" day, this view would be compromised due to one major culprit. >> serious air pollution problem of the because of the health impact it's now illegal in the bay area to burn wood or fire logs on days when there's a winter "spare the air" alert. >> reporter: but this year, new laws are in place for violators lighting manufactured logs or wood in an indoor or outdoor fireplace during alert days. christine rosales explains. >> first time violators will have the option to take a wood smoke awareness course and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)